Libertarian Views

by Greg Davies

Archive for September, 2008

Who is Sarah palin?

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In many ways, Sarah Palin seems like she was chosen specifically for her list of personal traits.

Her steadfast disapproval of abortion should gain respect from the sort of Republican faithful who may have felt left behind by McCain. Additionally, her child with Down syndrome and pregnant daughter shows that she stands behind her pro-life policies in her personal life. Also, she is clearly pro-Second Amendment, which further buys her points with Republicans, as does her son in Iraq.

Sarah Palin also helps bridge the attractiveness gap between McCain and Obama, and possibly wins more of the coveted mother votes.

However, none of these things really relate to important issues, but instead appeal to people’s personal experiences and biases. Sarah Palin’s actual political stances are largely obscured by her lack of national level impact and past attention, as well as her lack of communication to the press and public in general. This lack of information demonstrates a general tendency in politics to ignore important issues in favor of trivialities.

Written by Greg Davies

September 29th, 2008 at 2:30 pm

Posted in General

Our Trade with China

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There is a commonly held belief that our trade with China is somehow damaging to American interests, and that the government should take steps to make this country less dependent on the Chinese.

One reason for this is the fear of a trade deficit. Clearly, our imports from China far exceed our exports to China. However, nobody is being forced to buy Chinese. The trade with China is being done according to how the two countries can get maximum benefit. Besides that, the U.S. is getting something valuable, while all the Chinese get in return is money, which functionally isn’t worth its weight in toilet paper.

Another complaint about trade with China is the morality of trading with a country that oppresses its citizenry. Although this point might seem valid, the reality is that trading with the Chinese is a way to improve the country. When businesses trade with a country with limited economic freedoms on free-market terms, that doesn’t corrupt the United States any, but it does corrupt China’s government controls on economy. This is the reason for China’s rapidly expanding economy and reduction in poverty. International trade is one of the only types of foreign aid that actually works.

Possibly the most personal complaint that people have against foreign trade is that outsourcing of jobs takes those jobs away from Americans who need them. Seeing people we know lose their jobs certainly has more immediacy than any of the positive benefits of foreign trade. However, the loss of a job here creates benefits elsewhere. Furthermore, part of remaining competitive in the global economy means holding American workers to high standards. If the government needs to shield American workers from overseas competition, then the lower standards imposed on Americans will ultimately hurt the country more than it helps us.

Overall, foreign trade benefits the country and talk about the need to close the trade deficit is misguided.

Written by Greg Davies

September 26th, 2008 at 2:35 pm

Posted in General

Universal Health Care is Overrated

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A perennial issue raised by Democrats is the idea that America’s health care system is ineffective, and that universal health coverage should be provided by the federal government.

In support of this idea, supporters of universal health care cite studies which state that the United States spends more on health care per capita than any other country, yet the healthcare system is less effective in terms of longevity of life of Americans. Although the claim about spending is true, criticisms of healthcare in the U.S. are largely unfounded.

One major flaw in the argument is that it fails to address outside factors in determining life expectancy aside from health care. Life as an American is simply more dangerous and exciting than other developed countries in terms of murder rate, fatal car accidents, and many other factors which cut average life expectancy short. Furthermore, the United States has high obesity and other health problems. Change in health care policy would be completely ineffective in solving these issues.

Another argument in favor of free universal health care is that every other developed nation has it, and it must therefore be desirable. However, even ignoring the logical fallacies of that argument, the argument fails to address the ways in which U.S. healthcare is superior to those developed nations. The most significant of these ways is that the healthcare in the United States is far more innovative than government provided care. As a result of competition in the market, most recent leaps and bounds in medical treatment have come from here. Much of the higher per capita cost of health care goes into research and development.

However, other countries with public care are able to profit off of our research. The ability to leech off of the successes of the United States camouflages many of the problems with the health care systems of other developed nations. If the U.S. were to adopt universal health care, the motivation to innovate and improve would no longer exist, and the entire world’s health care would suffer as a result.

The current health care system in this country is in many ways superior to any other in the world, and increased government control would only serve to stifle invention and create shortages of treatment.

Written by Greg Davies

September 24th, 2008 at 2:33 pm

Posted in General

You Can’t Cure Poverty by Giving Money to Poor People

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Lyndon B. Johnson’s greatest ambition as U.S. president was his “Great Society” program, a massive expansion in federal welfare centered on the idea that the government has an obligation to correct society’s ills. As part of his welfare plans, Johnson pushed congress into creating the Economic Opportunity Act, part of a major attack on the nation’s poverty. Since Lyndon B. Johnson signed the “War on Poverty” legislation into existence, the government has spent trillions of dollars on the elimination of poverty, and through their efforts poverty in the United States has been statistically eliminated.

A quick internet search will reveal that the government spends enough on eliminating poverty to give all the poor people in the U.S. enough money that they will no longer be under the poverty level. Therefore, the United States does not have any poverty. This does not even account for the private charity that goes into ending the problem of poverty. However, it is clear that despite all this spending, poverty has not been eliminated from this country. The baffling, unpleasant truth that social welfare tends to avoid is that poverty cannot be eliminated by spending money on it.

As the types of people who support social charity enjoy pointing out, the U.S. has more than enough wealth for every citizen (and quite a few non-citizens) to live comfortably. In a society such as this, the most obvious reason for people to not be well off is an improper distribution of wealth.

Blaming the rich is an obvious thing to do in this case, as they clearly have a larger share of money than they deserve. However, the reason those people became rich is because of people like us buying things from them, and it’s difficult to criticize people for having too much money while we give them more.

It is also possible to blame the poor themselves for being lazy and unproductive. However, blaming someone for his own predicament is a very heartless thing to do, and anyone could produce a picture of some helpless impoverished child and make you look like a complete jerk.

That’s why the easy way out of this whole situation is to blame the government. The government creates an atmosphere of entitlement that makes it easy to stay poor, while supporting those who already have money in order to make it difficult to stop being poor. Laws such as minimum wage make it illegal for people to accept low-paying jobs, while government housing projects tear down perfectly good low-income housing in order to create nearly inhospitable living areas. The result of government aid is to bolster a perpetual American underclass, able to survive in poverty but unable to escape it.

Written by Greg Davies

September 22nd, 2008 at 2:31 pm

Posted in General

Change

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The key debate during this round of presidential elections seems to be which candidate is more likely to enact “change” in the country’s politics. The attempts by each candidate to capture this description can be seen clearly in the focus of their ads and their decisions leading up to the election. McCain’s attempts to capture this title can be seen in the constant description of himself as a “maverick” and his out-of-nowhere selection of Palin as running mate. Meanwhile, the phrase “more of the same” appears repeatedly in Obama’s ads when describing McCain, and Obama has frequently talked about his status as the true “candidate of change.” Clearly, both of these candidates are playing off of a discontent with the current state of the country (and the country’s current administration) by promising to be somehow different.

However, even as these two promise change, many of their moves thus far have shown extreme trepidation in seeming too radical or different. For one thing, running on the Republican ticket obviously gives McCain at least some connection to Bush, and his failure to renounce the current administration clearly shows an attempt to balance his “maverick” image with a desire to avoid alienating the party faithful. Meanwhile, Obama’s selection of Joe Biden as a running mate seems like a deliberate attempt to reach out to those perhaps turned off by perceptions of Obama as too extreme.

The unfortunate reality is that the real candidates of change were predestined to lose from the start. The two party system in U.S. politics is excellent at weeding out candidates who vary from the status quo. As a result, candidates who would truly change the country (whether for better or for worse) are never given any sort of chance. When these two candidates do run it is generally more of a political statement than a serious bid. People like Ron Paul, Chuck Baldwin, Ralph Nader, or Bob Barr would do some real damage to the status quo (and in some cases, to the country), but none of them will ever do so, because unfortunately the American people do not truly want change, but would rather things stay comfortably grim.

Written by Greg Davies

September 19th, 2008 at 2:38 pm

Posted in General

In A Year of Record Profits for Big Oil…

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An interesting trend in recent politics in general which seems especially predominant in Obama’s campaign is a tendency to vilify oil companies. It is understandable that such a vast and profitable business would draw a great deal of resentment from people. This is especially understandable given the fact that gas prices continue to go up, despite the fact that, as many political ads point out, “Big Oil” is making record profits. This trend seems to many to be extremely unfair. This issue is especially personal for people since oil may be the single most important resource for our modern life style, and few people would know how to get along without it. Unfair though it may sound, however, the increase in the price of oil is not the result of companies being evil, but rather comes as the result of an increasing demand for a good with limited supply.

It is fairly elementary economics that when a good is in high demand but has a short supply, the price will go up, especially if that demand is as urgent as the United States’ demand for oil. In this situation, gas prices will increase, regardless of what politicians do. Obama’s suggestion that we need to punish oil companies for their success through higher taxes is counterproductive, as increasing the cost of production will only cause the price of oil to go up faster. Although it may be satisfying to enforce punitive taxes for companies’ success, striking at oil companies would only be biting the hand that feeds modern society.

Written by Greg Davies

September 17th, 2008 at 2:37 pm

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Voting Republican Will Not Reduce Welfare

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Although Democrats and Republicans disagree on many things, one opinion shared by both is that if you vote Republican, you vote against increased control of the economy, whereas if you vote Democrat, then you are presumably in favor of the government’s economic intervention. However, in this field the line between Republican and Democrat is not as solid as many would like to believe. Any given government administration will inevitably increase government’s role in the economy and in society in general, regardless of political affiliation.

The recent bailout of the mortgaging industry and the Federal Reserve’s bailout of AIG are both perfect examples of corporate welfare at work. These two bailouts both involved the spending of hundreds of billions of dollars and increased federal control of what were previously privately owned businesses. In many ways, the businesses which required the government assistance were paying for past mistakes, and had not really done anything to deserve the bailout. However, when things go wrong, people will often demand that the government should be the force which sets them right again. Neither Republicans nor Democrats will pass up an opportunity to increase government influence, even if it means spending money the American people can’t really afford.

As long as people continue to turn to the government to solve all their problems, welfare will continue to increase, regardless of party stances.

Written by Greg Davies

September 15th, 2008 at 2:36 pm

Posted in General

Energy Independence is a Terrible Idea

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One of the hot issues in this upcoming election is the idea of energy independence.  Like synergy and compassionate conservative, energy independence is a catchy phrase, even though few people seem to grasp its implications.

The first issue with energy independence is the question of who exactly the United States wants to be independent from.  More of our oil is imported from Canada than from any other nation.  Are we afraid that the Canadians are going to turn on us?  Of course, the logical response is that we want to be independent from the Middle East, what with it being an unstable region full of people who want to blow us up.  This is especially true since those in the Middle East who don’t currently hate us are being pushed that way by our current policies (except Israel, but they don’t count, since they don’t have oil).  However, the government cutting off trade with the Middle East would not exactly endear them to us.

This reflects one of the primary issues with the idea of “energy independence.”  Cutting off trade with other countries shuts America off from the global community, and sends the message that we want as little contact with the outside world as possible.  This isolationist idea may have been seen as acceptable in the days of the Monroe Doctrine, but in the modern world, paranoid isolationism is hopelessly antiquated.

Another issue with energy independence is the consequences for the United States itself.  When the government restricts trade, nobody ever benefits.  The government would simply be giving more power to the large American oil companies who it routinely vilifies by giving them a state-imposed stranglehold on the energy market.  Some political ads would have you believe that energy independence would somehow magically cause lower gas prices.  However, when you restrict supply without doing anything about demand, there’s no way that could lead to lower gas prices.  The idea of relying on alternative energy sources is, at the moment, largely impractical.  The issue with even the best alternative energy sources is that they are inferior to oil in nearly every way, and until that issue can be addressed oil will remain the energy king.  Energy independence is a notion founded on xenophobia, and would hurt everybody involved.

Written by Greg Davies

September 10th, 2008 at 2:40 pm

Posted in General

The Role of Government in a Libertarian Society

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Although reducing the government’s role in society is a clear step towards progress, there are definite questions as to what a government’s role in society should be. The answer is that the primary responsibility of the government and the law is to protect people’s freedoms. Any function that the government performs which does not directly pertain to the protection of people’s freedoms is inappropriate.

For example, we should all have the freedom of not getting killed by random strangers. Hopefully, the police will help prevent us from getting killed by random strangers from this country, while the military will help stop all the random strangers overseas. Therefore, functions such as police and military are valid uses of government power.

However, many people would argue that in addition to protection of basic rights, the government is also capable of giving us many nice, shiny things that we would not want to provide by ourselves, such as roads, education, and welfare for the poor.  After all, nobody wants to have to worry about paying for roads, and charity is a lot more fun when it’s done by someone else. In these cases, the question arises as to whether it would be morally appropriate rob someone in order to pay for these things. After all, if you don’t pay taxes, the government will arrest you, and if you don’t go to jail, you’ll get shot. So using tax money for your personal influence is morally equivalent to robbery.  In the case of welfare, there is no reason to use taxes, as the poor can just as easily rob people themselves, and they are much more likely to get themselves things that they actually want than the government is.

Written by Greg Davies

September 8th, 2008 at 2:39 pm

Posted in General